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Why Ordinary Antivirus Fails To Protect Your PC

What antivirus software “protects” your computer?

Some of the common ones I see on client computers are:

  • Norton
  • McAfee
  • Trend Micro
  • BitDefender
  • VIPRE
  • AVG
  • Avast
  • Avira
  • Microsoft Security Essentials or Windows Defender
  • ESET NOD32

Bad news, my friend.

I’ve got bad news if you’re using one of these products – your PC ISN’T as safe from viruses and malware as you believe.

Older isn’t better in this case

All of these antivirus programs use 25-year-old technology to block viruses and malware.  It’s called virus definitions.

Multiple times every day, these software manufacturers push updated virus definitions to your computer.  It’s basically a list of known bad threats they have discovered that shouldn’t be allowed on your PC.

Two Flaws

I’m sure you can see the two major flaws with this.

First, it’s impossible to keep the list on your computer up-to-date. 

Cybercriminals are always writing new scripts to attack computers. 

It’s only after these new viruses are released on the Internet and have done their damage that antivirus vendors know they exist, reverse engineer how they work, and add them to the “bad list.” 

This process can take days or even weeks – leaving your computer completely unprotected.

Second, it’s easy to bypass the list.

Hackers know how these lists scan incoming files to determine whether it is good or bad, whether it should be allowed or blocked. 

So they modify their code just enough so your antivirus software doesn’t recognize it as being malicious – simply because it’s not on “the list” in the virus definitions database.

Think of it as using a fake ID.

Use Technology To Fight Technology

What’s the solution?

Fortunately, there is a new antivirus software that utilizes the latest technology to combat against all types of virus and malware infections without using a list.

This antivirus protection stops any threat – known or unknown – from damaging your computer. 

How?

It uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to determine if the actions a particular file or program is performing are normal or malicious.  If it’s malicious, it immediately shuts it down.

There are no outdated virus definition lists and no days or weeks of your computer being vulnerable.

I’ve Seen It Work

I installed this new protection on a client’s computer in late October.  On New Year’s Eve, while I was vacationing in Arizona, I received an email alert that the Cybersecurity Antivirus had stopped a hidden, malicious file stored in the computer’s recycle bin from encrypting all her files and rendering her computer inoperable.

The report showed exactly where the file was located and specifically what files on the computer it was trying to modify.

Because it immediately quarantined it, this client didn’t experience any problems.  And more importantly, she didn’t have to shell out any money for a virus removal.

You Decide

Antivirus software MUST be installed on your computer.  Anything is better than nothing.

But is it smart to use antiquated technology that doesn’t really protect your computer from the latest threats? 

You spend between $0 and $100 for antivirus “protection,” but end up having to spend $100-$200 more to clean up your PC when that “protection” fails you (and it will).

 Alternatively, the Cybersecurity Antivirus protection can keep your computer safe and keep money in your pocket for less than $150 a year.
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How to Test and Optimize Your Internet Speed

Clients frequently call me complaining their Internet is running slow.

Web sites take longer than they should to load. Streaming videos start, stop, start, and stop – making it impossible to enjoy entertainment on their PC or smart TV.

I’d like to provide you some tips on how you can test and optimize your Internet speed.

Know Your Numbers

First, it’s important to know what Internet speed you’re paying for from your Internet Service Provider.

Unfortunately, many providers don’t clearly identify this on your monthly bill, disguising it with fancy names like “Extreme Internet” or “Ultra Internet.” You may have to search their website to get determine the exact speed (such as 100Mbps) you’re subscribed to.

Test … And Test Again

After you know what speeds you’re paying for, you should run several Internet speed tests. I recommend using www.speakeasy.net/speedtest and www.speedtest.net.

Keep in mind these tips when testing your connection:
• Only run a speed test when you’re not doing anything else on the Internet. Otherwise, your results won’t be accurate.
• Run speed tests at different times of the day. Network congestion can cause slow Internet speeds.
• If possible, run at least one test with your computer connected directly to your cable modem instead of through your router. This will help you determine if your router may be causing problems.
• Use multiple computers to run the speed tests – but not at the time same. This can pinpoint a problem with your computer or Internet browser instead of with your Internet connection.
Reboot

If your speed test results are significantly lower than what you’re paying for, you should reboot both your cable modem and router. Unplug the power cord from both devices, wait about two minutes, then plug them back in – cable modem first.

This often clears up any “junk” clogging up your Internet pipeline.

After about five minutes, you can run another speed test to see if your connection has improved.

Change Browsers

The program you use to surf the Internet can make all the difference in the world.

I recommend using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox instead of Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer.

Chrome and Firefox typically load websites much faster, are significantly safer, and encounter fewer problems than other browsers.

Regularly Tune-Up Your PC

Junk builds up on your computer with regular use. Cookies and other files can cause your computer to run slower, especially on the Internet.

It’s important to perform regular maintenance on your computer, including clearing out junk and temporary files, running virus scans, and defragmenting your hard drive.

Visit https://www.calibreforhome.com/2013/05/9-tips-to-keep-your-computer-running-smoothly-2/ for 9 tips to keep your computer running smoothly.

Make A Call

If you’ve taken all of these steps and your Internet still is slower than a snail, you’ll most likely need to call either your Internet Service Provider or a computer professional or both.